Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/15/2018

Electric cars and their hydrogen-powered counterparts could refuel in seconds at the same location, thanks to a new flow battery produced by chemists at the University of Glasgow. The battery is comprised of two tanks of membrane-divided liquids consisting of a suspension of nanomolecules storing large quantities of energy that can be released either as electricity or hydrogen.

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New Atlas
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University of Glasgow
8/15/2018

Since YouTube's inception, the video medium has introduced a growing number of young people to the possibilities available in science, technology, engineering and math. Some of the most popular STEM-related channels focus on engineering under the umbrella of science and technology coverage.

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ASME
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YouTube
8/15/2018

Computer modeling is allowing Huntington Ingalls Industries' Ingalls Shipbuilding to reconfigure welding sequences to avoid warping. Tests during construction of a Coast Guard cutter reduced distortion by 30% and production costs by 13%.

8/15/2018

An early device that brought mechanization and speed to fabric tufting and spurred the growth of carpet manufacturing in Georgia was recently designated an ASME Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark. The designation ceremony took place on July 31 at Shaw Industries in Dalton, Ga.

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asme.org
8/14/2018

Weather patterns are contributing to accelerated erosion in the Minnesota River Basin, leading to increased sediment loads downstream. A new study that outlines the use of an assessment tool to simulate discharge changes in Le Sueur watershed asserts that increasing water retention could solve the problem.

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MDPI (Switzerland)
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water retention, Le Sueur
8/14/2018

The Army Corps of Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency are clarifying where they will grant states permitting power under the Clean Water Act for waters within their boundaries. The move is part of the Trump administration's bid to encourage states and tribes to assume more of the responsibility.

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The Hill
8/14/2018

The pipes in Toronto's drainage system, many of which are more than 100 years old, are not equipped to handle the area's increasingly severe rainstorms, says Frank Quarisa, acting general manager for Toronto Water. City officials say efforts to mitigate the flooding problem are ongoing, but critics are calling for quicker action, as well as new stormwater fees on homes and businesses with surfaces that produce excess runoff.

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The Toronto Star
8/14/2018

In Valley Park, a suburb of St. Louis, a levee is protecting the town from rising water but could cause an elevated risk of flooding in other towns along the Meramec River. "If you live on a river and your property is in a floodplain of some kind, you're eventually going to get wet," says Gerald Galloway, a civil engineering professor at the University of Maryland who spent decades studying the Mississippi River Basin.

8/14/2018

The 270-acre LaPlatte River Marsh in Shelburne, Vt., has joined six other wetlands in the state with Class I protection, which will increase the buffer surrounding it from 50 to 100 feet. "You risk death by a thousand cuts if you don't take steps to protect these special areas," says Jon Groveman, policy and water program director for the Vermont Natural Resources Council.

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VTDigger (Vermont)
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LaPlatte River Marsh
8/14/2018

California's once-broad and sandy Oceanside and Carlsbad beaches have withered to narrow, stony stretches, but a federally funded program may restore some of their former splendor with a sand bypass system. The system would continually vacuum sand from Oceanside's harbor and send it as far as about a mile south.

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Oceanside, California